Do all Students Graduate on time?

You walk off stage firmly holding your high school diploma in your hands. You have dreamed of this moment your whole adolescent life. Now the next step of your dream is about to be fulfilled, attending college. Perhaps you have fantasied that it will be a time of non-stop partying or that your college years would prove to the best of your life. While for some that may be true, for most us these misconceptions are added to the ever-growing list of college myths. Here are 4 college myths that you still believe.

Most Students Graduate In 4 Years

As opposed to popular belief, a majority of college students do not graduate on time. According to completecollege.org, “A majority of public colleges graduate less than 50 percent of their full-time students in four years.”

In fact, in the United States only 19% of full time non-flagship students graduate with their 4-year bachelor’s degree on time.

While you should make it a goal to finish on time, it is not mandatory or even commonplace.

Community College Is Viewed as Less Than Universities

For some students, the lower tuition of community colleges is appealing but they fear that they are going to get a second-rate education if they attend. We tend to link price with quality and while in some cases that is reasonable, in the case of post-secondary education it is not.

“Many people have misconceptions about community colleges. But what they might not realize is that you can finish your first two years of your college education at a community college – at half the cost of a state university,” said Dr. Stacey Johnson, president of the East and Winter Park campuses at Valencia College. “You’ll be in smaller classes, get real opportunities to interact and know the professors and we offer the kind of support – through tutoring, math labs, communication labs and other learning supports – that many students could miss in a large university setting.”

You Will Spend All Your Time Partying

When most people think of college they think of wild parties and wild spring breaks on some tropical island. While there is a lot of fun to have while in college, the pressures of passing your classes tend to cut into your party time. That doesn’t mean that you won’t have any fun, in fact some colleges and universities are known for their parties, it just means that it most likely won’t be your focus once the term starts.

“College is all about work. In a classroom, you may sit among people of various backgrounds and ages but the goal of everyone there is to succeed,” said former college student, Mariah Martinez. “College is not just a social gathering, it’s an arena to work toward your future.”

A high GPA equals finding a job in your field

While having a high GPA makes you a better student and potential job candidate, some fields prefer experience over grades.

In a BBC survey of 2,000 employers, 63% noted relevant work experience to be critical or significant while only 42% looked for academic qualifications.

Although receiving good grades is essential, moving some focus from studying to pursue an internship might be better for you in the long run, depending on which career field you are interested in.

Now you know the truth behind some of college’s most popular misconceptions.